Beverley House Stables
If you can provide any photos associated with this stable, or additional information to fill any gaps then contact johnwslusar@gmail.com

1870-1881 Robert Peck
Robert Peck, born in Malton, Yorkshire on 4th March 1845 at his father, Charles Peck's training establishment at St Grove House, Norton, began training on his own account at Russley Park, Wiltshire for Lord Stamford in 1865, moving to Spring Cottage, Malton in 1868. He then took up residence in Beverley House, Newmarket, in 1870 where he recorded some of his greatest training achievements, including his two Epsom Derby victories, in 1873 with Doncaster (SR 2000) and again in 1880 with Bend Or (SR 2030). He married twice, his first wife being the daughter of Mr J Hind of Malton with whom he had two sons, Charles and Percy, who both went on to become accomplished trainers. In 1875, after notching up numerous racecourse victories with Doncaster, he purchased the colt for £10,000 and retired him to stud. However, he immediately sold Doncaster to the 1st Duke of Westminster for £14,000, the Duke placing him at his Eaton Stud in Cheshire. Bob Peck trained predominantly for the 1st Duke of Westminster and James Merry, and in 1873 he guided James Merry's Marie Stuart (SR 1962) to dual Classic success, firstly in the Epsom Oaks and later in the St Leger. In 1877 he trained Hampton to win the Goodwood Cup, Doncaster Cup and Epsom Gold Cup, while in 1881 he won the 2000 Guineas with Peregrine (SR 1947) owned by the 1st Duke of Westminster and ridden by Fred Webb. Peck had a deep affection for the Lincoln Handicap, winning it in 1878 with Kaleidoscope and training the 1879 winner Touchet. After the success of Kaleidoscope Peck said that only a 3-year-old good enough to be in the Derby field could win the Lincoln. As his evidence he stated that in the 25 years since the inaugural running of the Lincoln, only four 3-year-olds had won it, one later winning the St Leger, one beating a horse which ran second in the Derby, one which won the most valuable handicaps carrying top weight, and the fourth winning the Great Metropolitan at Epsom which, in those days, was a highly prized race. In 1881, at the very young age of 36, he retired from training to become an owner, racing manager and owner of a country seat at Howbury Hall, Renfold in rural Bedfordshire. He installed James Hopper as his trainer at Beverley House, while Bob Peck shared control of Park Lodge where he installed Martin Gurry to train horses which Peck owned in partnership with General Owen Williams, including The Baird who won 16 consecutive races in 1885 and was runner-up to Ormonde in the 1886 Derby. At the end of the 1885 season Bob Peck purchased Barcaldine from Ireland, and the horse went on to win the Westminster Cup, Orange Cup at Ascot, the Epsom Stakes and the Northumberland Plate in his second season for his new owner. Robert claimed Barcaldine, who was undefeated in all his 13 races, to be the best horse he ever trained or owned. The Peck/Gurry partnership ended at the close of the 1886 Flat season, Gurry going on to Bedford Lodge, training for Squire George Baird who leased Bedford Lodge from Captain James Machell. Robert Peck died of a brain haemorrhage in Scarborough on 17th August 1899 aged just 54.
1873 Epsom Derby DONCASTER (SR 2000) 45/1 owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1873 Epsom Oaks MARIE STUART (SR 1962) 2/1 fav owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Tom Cannon senior
1873 St Leger MARIE STUART (SR 1962) 9/4 owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Tom Osborne
1874 Goodwood Cup DONCASTER owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1875 Ascot Gold Cup DONCASTER owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by George Fordham
1875 Alexandra Plate DONCASTER owned by James Merry, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1877 Doncaster Cup HAMPTON owned by F G Hobson, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1877 Northumberland Plate HAMPTON owned by F G Hobson, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1877 Goodwood Cup HAMPTON owned by F G Hobson, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1878 Lincoln Handicap KALEIDOSCOPE 6/1 owned and trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Glover
1878 Epsom Gold Cup HAMPTON owned by F G Hobson, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1879 Lincoln Handicap TOUCHET 6/1 owned by Lord Rosebery, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Harry Constable
1879 Richmond Stakes BEND OR owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Archer
1880 Epsom Derby BEND OR (SR 2030) 2/1 fav owned by Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Archer
1880 St James's Palace Stakes BEND OR 30/100 fav owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by George Fordham
1881 2000 Guineas PEREGRINE (SR 1947) 15/2 owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Webb
1881 City & Suburban Stakes BEND OR owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Archer
1881 Epsom Gold Cup BEND OR owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Archer
1881 Champion Stakes BEND OR owned by 1st Duke of Westminster, trained by Robert Peck and ridden by Fred Archer

NEWMARKET RACECOURSES
For over 4 centuries racing has been staged in Newmarket, but how have the racecourses evolved from an initial starting point at Fleam Dyke Pumping Station, some 8 miles from the town, with a winning post barely 200 metres from the town centre, into two world recognized, excellent racecourses and a universal acceptance that Newmarket is the Headquarters of racing?
To access an interactive racecourse map showing over 50 individually named racecourses CLICK HERE. The map will enable you to:-
1. Determine when extended races over 8 miles, 6 miles and 4 miles began to be replaced by the courses now visited by thousands annually;
2. Consider how the challenge of crossing the Devil's Dyke was overcome;
3. Contemplate why the town no longer has a steeplechase course despite having at least 5 courses during the past 2 centuries;
4. Examine the practicalities of having up to 48 starting posts and winning posts;
5. Appreciate that it was not financially viable to have an open racecourse spread widely across the heath, with a finishing post barely 200 metres from the town centre;
6. Research how and why the Cambridgeshire Handicap has been contested over 3 different courses.
NOTE: The map does not make mention of 2 particular courses:-
(i) Sefton Course (also known as the Cambridge Road Course)
Source: 1970 Raceform.  Used from 1959 to 1975.
(ii) New Circular Course
The Circular Handicap was run on Friday 29th October 1875 on the New Circular Course of about two miles.
Source: London Standard (30th October 1875): ''the horses started near the Turn of the Lands, ran back way of the Cambridgeshire Course towards the Ditch, and afterwards proceeded down the side of the Tan Gallop, and turned into the Rowley Mile near the Bretby Stakes starting post, finishing at the stand at the end of the flat. Except in the hollow near the Cambridgeshire start the runners should have been visible all the way if the sky had been bright and clear''.
Another report hoped that the Circular Handicap would become a feature in future programmes, as it would be contested in front of the new grandstand which would be completed in about a year and would be able to accommodate thousands.
(I am grateful to Tim Cox for bringing attention to these 2 courses.)
Enjoy researching the intriguing history of Newmarket and its many racecourses.

1882-1892 James Hopper
When Robert Peck had earned a sufficient fortune to enable him to retire, and to become an owner and buy his own stud, he appointed a young James Hopper to be his trainer at Beverley House Stables. Initially the pair enjoyed success, winning the 1882 Cambridgeshire towards the end of the season with Hackness ridden by Sam Loates. This maybe was a pointer to the future, because Loates would eventually take the helm at Beverley House in the early part of the next century. However, things became difficult between Hopper and Peck. Hopper had originally taken over at Beverley House as private trainer to Peck. This situation changed when a friend of Peck's, Mr J Davis, was given permission to move his horses to Beverley House.

I am grateful to Ordnance Survey (© Crown Copyright) for permission to use the 1836 map shown above. Beverley House is 2
To enjoy the experience of a day at Newmarket races in May 1838 CLICK HERE
As a consequence, Hopper had to become a public trainer, training at 'Florence House'. Davis, in turn, introduced the millionaire Mr Naylor to Hopper, which further boosted the number of horses at his stable. In March 1883 Hopper trained Knight of Burley to win the Lincoln and it was immediately targeted and backed for the end of season Manchester Handicap. However, Peck's Hackness was also backed for the November Handicap and this caused tension between Davis and Peck, with Hopper at the centre of the dispute. Tension was increased when Keel-Row was made favourite for the Third Welter Handicap at Newmarket, landing some hefty bets for Peck, but Davis was not told about the coup and wagered his money on a loser in the field. Davis withdrew his horses from Florence House Stables, expecting his friend Naylor to do the same, but Naylor stuck with Hopper. In 1884 Hopper trained Asil for Admiral Tryon to win a novelty Arab race at Newmarket on Wednesday 2nd July 1884. At Florence House life became difficult for Hopper, and on Sunday 17th May 1892 he cut his own throat. He did not die from his self-inflicted injury, but the wound broke afresh on Thursday 26th May 1892 and he died later that day.
1882 Goodwood Stakes FORTISSIMO owned by Mr J Davis, trained by James Hopper and ridden by Charles Wood
1882 Cambridgeshire HACKNESS 100/12 owned by Robert Peck, trained by James Hopper and ridden by Sam Loates
1883 Lincoln Handicap KNIGHT OF BURGHLEY 100/12 owned by Mr J Davis, trained by James Hopper and ridden by Charles Wood

1892-1903 George Harvey Blackwell
George Harvey Blackwell served his training apprenticeship with Matt Dawson at Heath House before branching out on his own in 1892, gradually increasing his stable strength. By 1896 Blackwell had been invited to take charge of the 11 yearlings of Baron de Hirsch. George, based at Beverley House Stables, landed the Doncaster Cup in 1898 with Pinfold for Sir James Miller, as well as securing the 1898 Cesarewitch and Manchester Handicap with Chaleureux. A year later he trained Newhaven II to win the City and Suburban Handicap at Epsom. However, it was in the early years of the 20th century that George enjoyed his most successful period, winning the 1901 1000 Guineas with Aida (SR 1878) and then landed the 1903 Triple Crown with Rock Sand (SR 2051). At the end of the 1903 season he moved to La Grange Stables, taking his champion Rock Sand with him.  In July 1906 the Sporting Life listed all of the Newmarket Stables together with their respective trainers; George Blackwell was listed at Lagrange. In 1920 George sold La Grange to Lord Glanely and moved to Sunnyside (Nunnery Stables) where he completed a unique double, having trained the Epsom Derby winner in 1903, he completed an unusual double training the 1923 Grand National winner Sergeant Murphy.

Above photo shown courtesy of Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News 1899
In 1936 his daughter Angela married classic winning jockey Henri Jellis, and when Jellis hung up his riding boots in 1936 he began his training career, training at Beverley House in 1937. George trained at Sunnyside, in Park Lane, Newmarket, where he resided until his death on 16th September 1942 aged 81.
1898 Cesarewitch CHALEUREUX 75/20 owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Otto Madden
1898 Manchester November Handicap CHALEUREUX 8/1 owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Otto Madden
1899 City & Suburban Handicap NEWHAVEN II 7/1 owned by Mr W Cooper, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Mornington Cannon
1901 1000 Guineas AIDA (SR 1878) 13/8 fav owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Otto Madden
1902 Woodcote Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1902 Coventry Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1902 Champagne Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1902 Dewhurst Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 2000 Guineas ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by J H Martin
1903 Epsom Derby ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 St James's Palace Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 St Leger ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher

1904-1922 Sam Loates
Samuel Loates, born into a racing family on 29th January 1864, was destined to become a jockey along with his three brothers, Tommy, Charles and John. Sam began his apprenticeship with Tom Cannon at Danebury, Wiltshire, riding his first winner aged 17. He enjoyed an exceptional career, becoming champion jockey in 1899, and riding 7 English Classic winners, including the 1884 and 1885 Epsom Derby on Harvester (SR 1983) who dead-heated with St Gatien, and Sir Visto (SR 1966) owned by Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery. On the back of his champion jockey title in 1899 he was offered a 3-year retainer with Sir John Blundell Maple, being paid £2000 per annum and £25 as a bonus for each winner. Alas, on Thursday 14th November 1901, whilst riding Nateby in the Compton Welter Handicap at Northampton won by Young Neville, he broke his thigh bone, losing the sight in one eye, saddling him with a limp for life and ending his riding career.

Above photo shown courtesy of Illustrated Sporting & Dramatic News 1899
In 1904 he was invited to train for Solly Joel at Beverley House, and in July 1906 the Sporting Life listed all of the Newmarket Stables together with their respective trainers, Sam Loates was listed at Beverley House. In 1909 prominent owner Mr J Byrne was so fed up with the bad luck Newmarket trainer Edwin Couch endured that he upped sticks and moved all of his horses to Beverley House to be trained by Sam Loates. Edwin Couch, understandably distressed by the setback, shot himself. Although Sam did not train many high-profile winners, the highlight if his training career was in 1918 at Manchester when he secured a consecutive race treble for owner Solly Joel with Polyorama, Syndrian and Daphne all ridden by Steve Donoghue. Sam moved from Beverley House at the end of the 1922 season to be replaced by Willie Jarvis.
1907 Visitors Plate at Newmarket VANCOUVER (100/8) owned and trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Hughes
1908 Plantation Plate at Newmarket TEMNOS (evens fav) owned by Mr J B Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Walter Griggs
1918 Royal Standard Stakes at Manchester POLYORAMA (10/11 fav) owned by Solly Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Steve Donoghue
1918 Beaufort Handicap at Manchester SYNDRIAN (2/1) owned by Solly Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Steve Donoghue
1918 Whitsuntide Two-Year-Old Stakes at Manchester DAPHNE (5/2) owned by Solly Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Steve Donoghue
1919 Autumn Two-Year-Old Plate at Hurst Park LONGSTOP (11/10 fav) owned by Solly Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Brownie Carslake
1919 Wilton Handicap at Salisbury PANDION (9/2) owned by Solly Joel, trained by Sam Loates and ridden by Steve Donoghue

1923-1924 Willie Jarvis
William Jarvis took over at Beverley House in 1923, although by 1924 he had moved on to Egerton House, leasing Beverley House to Fred Butters.

newmarket 1918e.JPG (26765 bytes) Newmarket 1940.JPG (18535 bytes) newmarket 1948e.JPG (10601 bytes)

1924-1926 Fred Butters
Fred S Butters was born into a racing family on 3rd December 1887, his father Joseph trained in Austria and Newmarket, while his brother Frank was extremely successful, training 16 Classic winners. After his school days Fred began training in Austria until the First World War disrupted his career. He was interned during the War, and then was Assistant to his father in Newmarket immediately after the War had ended. However, in 1924 he leased Beverley House Stables from his brother-in-law, while in 1927 he took over the lease at Heath House Stables, although within a year he suffered a setback when, in April 1928, Mr Foxhall P Keane announced his retirement from racing, having enjoyed limited success with the horses he had sent to Fred Butters at Heath House. Fred stayed at Heath House until 1934 before moving to the Kingsclere stables of Captain Wills.

1937-50 Henri Jelliss
Henri Albert Jelliss, son of 13 times champion jockey of Belgium Charles Jelliss, was born at Mons, Belgium on 23rd November 1891. After schooling he took up an apprenticeship with Tom Jennings junior, opening his winning account aboard Rhyme at Newmarket on 5th May 1908 aged 16 and weighing just 6 stone. He won the 1911 Cambridgeshire with Long Shot for Solly Joel, while later in his career he won 3 English Classics. He retired from riding at the end of a successful 1935 season, launching his training career at Beverley House Stables which were owned by his father-in-law George Blackwell. He gained an early success just 2 days into the Flat season when Paladin won the Chaplin Plate at Lincoln. He won the 1939 Wokingham Stakes at Royal Ascot with America and, in his first full season after the War he won the 1946 2000 Guineas with Happy Knight ridden by Tommy Weston. At the end of that season Henri's son Harry was enticed away from Beverley House by Dorothy Paget to train privately for her at Palace House Stables, although Henri continued to act as assistant to Jack Jarvis at nearby Park Lodge Stables. In 1950 Henri requested that any remaining horses Dorothy Paget had at Beverley House should be removed and she duly transferred them to Fulke Walwyn at Lambourn. Henri was still churning out the winners in the 1956 season, receiving a boost when Miss R Parsons sent a good number of fillies to Beverley House Stables to be trained by Jelliss, although within a season Jelliss had sold the training establishment to Humphrey Cottrill in readiness for the 1958 season.
1927 Coronation Stakes BOOK LAW 4/9 fav owned by 2nd Viscount Astor, trained by Alec Taylor junior and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1927 St Leger BOOK LAW (SR 1972) 7/4 fav owned by 2nd Viscount Astor, trained by Alec Taylor junior and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1929 Epsom Oaks PENNYCOMEQUICK (SR 1906) 11/10 fav owned by 2nd Viscount Astor, trained by Joe Lawson and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1934 Ayr Gold Cup FIGARO 7/2 owned and trained by Jack Leach and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1935 Epsom Oaks QUASHED (SR 1922) 33/1 owned by Baron Stanley, trained by Colledge Leader and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1935 Nunthorpe Stakes SHALFLEET 9/4 owned and trained by Harry Leader and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1935 Portland Handicap SHALFLEET 8/1 owned and trained by Harry Leader and ridden by Henri Jelliss
1939 Wokingham Stakes AMERICA 20/1 owned by F W Wilmot, trained by Henri Jelliss and ridden by Bobby Jones
1946 2000 Guineas HAPPY KNIGHT (SR 1814) 28/1 owned by Sir William Cooke, trained by Henri Jelliss and ridden by Tommy Weston

1957-1974 Humphrey Cottrill
Humphrey Lawson Cottrill, born on 10th September 1906 at Ashton upon Mersey, near Manchester, was the eldest son of racehorse trainer Harry Cottrill. Cottrill senior trained the 1927 2000 Guineas winner Apple Sammy (SR 1983) and the 1936 Epsom Oaks winner Lovely Rosa (SR 1731), as well as the Royal Hunt Cup and Portland Handicap winner Irish Elegance. Humphrey acted as assistant to his father from 1928, at Seven Barrow, Lambourn, until 1937, shortly before the outbreak of the War, where he carried out active service in India and Burma. In 1950 Humphrey worked as assistant trainer to Willie Pratt at Stanley House, followed by a two-year stint with Marcus Marsh between 1951 and 1952 before landing the plum job of private trainer to Major Lionel Holliday in 1952. He was with Holliday from 1952 to 1957, achieving major successes in the Coventry Stakes with Pirate King, the 1956 Queen Mary with Pharsalia and the 1957 Nunthorpe Stakes with Gratitude. However, he anticipated that the irascible Holliday would, at some stage, sack him, and when it happened at the end of the 1957 season Humphrey had already purchased Beverley House, transferring at the end of 1957 ready for the start of the 1958 Flat season. Cottrill continued his success during his 17 years at Beverley House, with the career high point training Your Highness to land the 1961 Irish Derby for Mrs Gladys Joel despite being unfancied at 33/1. Although Humphrey did not win an English Classic, he thought highly of St Pauli Girl, owned by Stanhope Joel, who was beaten just half a length by Fleet (SR 1906) in the 1967 1000 Guineas, and was quietly fancied at 7/1 in the 1967 Epsom Oaks but came up short by 3/4 length behind Pia (SR 1812). He retired from full time training at the end of the 1974 season, but was given a new lease of life after meeting Khalid Abdullah at Newbury when the Prince invited Cottrill to be his agent. Amongst his many successes for Prince Khalid was Known Fact who went on to win the 1980 2000 Guineas.
1958 Cumberland Lodge Stakes MON FETICHE 8/1 owned by Stanhope Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1959 Richmond Stakes DOLLAR PIECE 100/6 owned by Phillip Winstone, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Joe Mercer
1959 Solario Stakes INTERVENER 4/1 owned by Stanhope Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1960 Chester Vase MR HIGGINS 10/1 owned by Phillip Winstone, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Harry Carr
1960 Nunthorpe Stakes BLEEP-BLEEP 9/2 owned by Mrs M L Turner, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Harry Carr
1961 Irish Derby YOUR HIGHNESS (SR 1892) 33/1 owned by Mrs Gladys Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Herbert Holmes
1963 Brighton Derby Trial PORTOFINO 11/4 owned by Phillip Winstone, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Bill Rickaby
1965 Princess Elizabeth Stakes MIBA 11/4 owned by Stanhope Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Lester Piggott
1965 Pretty Polly Stakes MIBA 5/1 owned by Stanhope Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Eph Smith
1966 Horris Hill Stakes ALCAN 13/2 owned by Mrs Stanhope Joel, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1969 Fern Hill Stakes BELL SONG 15/2 trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Bruce Raymond

1975-1979 Yard left empty

1979-1996 Hugh Collingridge
Hugh Collingridge was born on 1st October 1947 and enjoyed success on a small scale in Newmarket for over 40 years. In 1979, after Beverley House stables had been empty for 4 years Hugh purchased the stables and made the brave decision to sell Beverley House but develop the stables. He enjoyed a number of high-profile successes during his time at the stables, notably with Buzzards Bay and Cuvee Charlie. In 1982 Buzzards Bay shocked racegoers by landing the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes at 50/1 for owner Mrs Vera McKinney, and also landed the Royal Hunt Cup in the same year at 14/1. In 1988 Collingridge trained Cuvee Charlie to win the Lincoln Handicap in the hands of Mark Rimmer. Hugh brought on a number of apprentices in his time at Beverley House, including Carl Hawksley who rode his first winner, Kath's Choice (14/1) at Folkestone on 16th July 1991 for Hugh, and joined Beverley House Stables in 1992. Hugh continued to trained at Beverley House, although in 1997 John Berry took over and Hugh moved on, later renting Harraton Court in Exning from Darryll Holland.
1982 Queen Elizabeth II Stakes BUZZARDS BAY 50/1 owned by Mrs Vera McKinney, trained by Hugh Collingridge and ridden by Walter Swinburn
1982 Royal Hunt Cup BUZZARDS BAY 14/1 owned by Mrs Vera McKinney, trained by Hugh Collingridge and ridden by Joe Mercer
1988 Lincoln Handicap CUVEE CHARLIE 33/1 owned by Richard Davies, trained by Hugh Collingridge and ridden by Mark Rimmer

1996-May 1998 Philip McEntee senior; May 1998-2000 Phil McEntee
Philip Matthew McEntee, born in Ireland on 25th March 1946, was a successful Flat race jockey who was crowned Champion apprentice in Ireland in 1966. He rode for over a decade, partnering more than 100 winners, but had his final ride in public on 24th May 1977 at Warwick, finishing out of the frame on Favedo. He then launched his training career in Ireland, although times were tough and he handed in his licence in 1986. He rode out for a number of stables, including Tom Bill and Jeff Pearce, until eventually he felt the time was right to reapply for his licence. He returned to the training ranks in 1991, initially at Cannock before moving on to Beverley House Stables in Newmarket, via Winkfield Stables and Cedar Farm Stables in Maidenhead. He was supported at Beverley House by his son, also named Phil, who rode for the stable as a conditional jockey. Philip McEntee senior died in May 1998, aged 52, and his son Phil took over at Beverley House. Today he trains at Racefield Stables, which were originally called Carriageway Stables.

1997- present John Berry
John Berry was born in the beautiful Scottish Border region into a family who were involved in racing and breeding, so it was natural for John to become an amateur jockey, although he only rode one winner over jumps, his big claim to fame being that he beat Richard Dunwoody and Venetia Williams. He then moved to Australia where he pursued a brief career as a track rider, although he returned to England to train in 1995 in stables on the Hamilton Road. However, by 1997 he had moved to Beverley House from where he has sent out a steady number of winners each season ever since. Arguably his most successful horse was Largesse who won the 1998 Doonside Cup at Ayr and 7 other races, but was also placed in prestigious races like the 1998 St Simon Stakes and 1999 Yorkshire Cup. Another horse which John guided to a string of successes was Rory Rocket who won 9 times at Brighton between 2015 and 2018 over distances between 10 furlongs and 12 furlongs. John is a character who maximises the opportunities racing's Headquarters offers. He rode Kadouchski to victory in the 2011 Newmarket Town Plate, the 342nd running of the historic race, and he was mayor of Newmarket between 2015 and 2016.
1998 Doonside Cup at Ayr LARGESSE 10/1 owned by Mrs Rosemary Moskowicz, trained by John Berry and ridden by John Egan

Top 5 Beverley House Stables horses of all time
ROCK SAND (1903 English Triple Crown)
BEND OR (1880 Epsom Derby, 1881 Champion Stakes)
DONCASTER (1873 Epsom Derby, 1875 Ascot Gold Cup)
MARIE STUART (1873 Epsom Oaks, St Leger)
PEREGRINE (1881 2000 Guineas)
© John Slusar 2020

ISBN 978-0-9957632-0-3

652 pages

774 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-1-0

352 pages

400 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-2-7

180 pages

140 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-3-4

264 pages

235 former courses

Copies of the above books are only available by emailing johnwslusar@gmail.com stating your requirements, method of payment (cheque payable to W.Slusar) or Bank transfer, and the address where the book(s) should be sent.
ORDER FORM
Download an order form
  Quantity Cost
Volume 1 North of Hatfield £19.99 + £4 postage    
Volume 2 South of Hatfield £14.99 + £3 postage    
Volume 3 Wales & Scotland £9.99 + £3 postage    
Volume 4 Ireland £9.99 + £3 postage    
Volumes 1 - 4 £54.96 + £5 postage    
Postage & Packaging    
Total    
Email order form to johnwslusar@gmail.com