Kremlin House Stables
If you can provide any photos associated with this stable, or additional information to fill any gaps then contact johnwslusar@gmail.com

1874-November 1903 Prince Soltykoff
Prince Dimitry (Demetry) Soltykoff, son of Prince Peter Soltykoff and nephew of Prince Alexis Soltykoff, was born on 11th December 1827 into the famous Imperial Russian Soltykoff family. Although his father was a famous art and antiquities collector, and his uncle Alexis was inspired by Indian art, Dimitry gained a life-long love of racing. He was the first Russian to be appointed a member of the Jockey Club in 1867, and he served as a Jockey Club Steward from 1890 to 1892. However, he is best remembered for building Kremlin House, on the Fordham Road in 1874, using rendered and painted brick, which he used as his Newmarket base and home, and later adding his own stables in the summer of 1891. Despite being a member of an Imperial Russian family, he came to England after the Crimean War (5th October 1853 to 30th March 1856) and loved the racing scene so much, and in particular Newmarket, that he decided to stay on. During his time resident at Kremlin House he employed a number of trainers, including Charles Blanton, Tom Jennings senior, Alfred Gibbons, Charles Waugh and finally Joe Butters. Although these trainers won him many prestigious races, including the Cambridgeshire, Cesarewitch and Ascot Gold Cup, he failed to win a Classic race. He was very selective about which horses should take their chances in a Classic race, and they seldom finished down the field. On four occasions his horse finished runner up in a Classic, beginning in 1875 when Balfe (3/1) was 3 lengths behind Craigmillar (SR 1985) in the St Leger. In 1886 Argo Navis was second in the 1000 Guineas and in the Oaks, on both occasions behind Miss Jummy (SR 1918). In 1903 Sun Rose was beaten 1 1/2 lengths by Quintessence (SR 1847) in the 1000 Guineas. He never had a runner in any of the 5 Irish Classics. In October 1903 he appointed Joe Butters to train for him at Kremlin House Stables, but within 6 weeks this arrangement was put in jeopardy when the Prince died on 21st November 1903 aged 74. In his will, dated 24th July 1889, he left £1000 to the Rous Cottage Hospital and Newmarket Almshouse, with a further £1000 to the Bentinck Benevolent Fund, but the vast majority of his estate, amounting to £328,354 (equivalent to £40 million in 2019), he left to his friend Mrs Elizabeth Bushell Clinton of Chesterfield Street, Mayfair. He also left her his freehold property, the Kremlin, all of his racehorses in training, all of his racehorses at stud, and his Lanwades Stud Farm at Kennet in the parish of Moulton. She agreed to Joe Butters continuing at Kremlin House as her trainer.
Prince Soltykoff's placed Classic runners
1875 St Leger BALFE (12/1) second beaten 3 lengths behind CRAIGMILLAR (SR 1985)
1880 Epsom Derby MASK (20/1) was third behind BEND OR (SR 2030)
1881 Epsom Derby SCOBELL (20/1) was 4th behind IROQUOIS (SR 1956)
1886 1000 Guineas ARGO NAVIS (25/1) second beaten 1 1/2 lengths behind MISS JUMMY (SR 1918)
1886 2000 Guineas MEPHISTO (33/1) third behind ORMONDE (SR 2063)
1886 Epsom Oaks ARGO NAVIS (100/30) second beaten 1/2 length by MISS JUMMY (SR 1918)
1892 2000 Guineas CURIO (50/1) third behind BONA VISTA (SR 1905)
1898 2000 Guineas NINUS (100/30) third behind DISRAELI (SR 1967)
1903 1000 Guineas SUN ROSE (20/1) second beaten 1 1/2 lengths by QUINTESSENCE (SR 1847)

The image above, drawn by Sir Leslie Ward, was published in Vanity Fair and is in the public domain because it's artist, Ward, died in 1922, over 95 years ago.

Prince Soltykoff's principal race winners
1875 Cesarewitch DUKE OF PARMA (4/1 fav) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Rossiter
1876 Great Metropolitan Stakes NEW HOLLAND (5/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Rossiter
1880 Cambridgeshire LUCETTA (16/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Greaves
1889 Jockey Club Stakes SHEEN owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1889 Champion Stakes at Newmarket GOLD owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1890 Ascot Gold Cup GOLD owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1890 Cesarewitch SHEEN (6/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1891 Lincoln Handicap LORD GEORGE (10/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Jimmy Woodburn
1895 Queen's Stand Plate at Ascot WOOLSTHORPE (100/15) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charlie Waugh and ridden by Mornington Cannon
1895 July Cup WOOLSTHORPE (13/8) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charlie Waugh and ridden by Mornington Cannon

The painting shown above was by Adrian Jones, an English painter and sculptor who specialised in horses, who was born in Ludlow on 9th February 1845 and died 24th January 1938. The picture is in the public domain as the artist died over 70 years ago.

1874-August 1887 Charles Blanton, Prince Soltykoff

Charles Blanton served as assistant trainer to Joseph Dawson before launching his own training career, representing such distinguished members of the turf as Sir John Astley, Prince Soltykoff and 'Mr Bird'. He won the 1866 Epsom Oaks with Tormentor (SR 1868) 5/1 for Benjamin Ellam Dunbar when ridden by Jimmy Mann, and the 1867 Portland Plate with Bounceaway for Prince Soltykoff well before the Prince had built Kremlin House. Charles Blanton also notched up 3 Lincoln Handicap winners; in 1869 with Sycee, in 1870 with Royal Rake and in 1875 with The Gunner at the rewarding odds of 30/1. Although still trainer to the Prince in 1874, at that stage he could not move his string across to Kremlin House for lack of stabling facilities.

I am grateful to Ordnance Survey (© Crown Copyright) for permission to use the 1836 map shown above. Kremlin House is 9

Charles Blanton (continued)
He continued to train for the Prince, although by 1880 he was training at Upper Station Road, and in 1881 he took on the post of private trainer to Lord Rosebery at Primrose Cottage, although this arrangement appeared to last for just one year. He then trained for the Prince right up to the time of his death on 2nd August 1887, after which he was replaced by Tom Jennings senior.
1874 Newcastle Stakes at Newmarket TRIPAWAY owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Edward Rossiter
1875 Cesarewitch DUKE OF PARMA (4/1 fav) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Rossiter
1876 Great Metropolitan Stakes NEW HOLLAND (5/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Rossiter
1880 Cambridgeshire LUCETTA (16/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charles Blanton and ridden by Greaves

NEWMARKET RACECOURSES
For over 4 centuries racing has been staged in Newmarket, but how have the racecourses evolved from an initial starting point at Fleam Dyke Pumping Station, some 8 miles from the town, with a winning post barely 200 metres from the town centre, into two world recognized, excellent racecourses and a universal acceptance that Newmarket is the Headquarters of racing?
To access an interactive racecourse map showing over 50 individually named racecourses CLICK HERE. The map will enable you to:-
1. Determine when extended races over 8 miles, 6 miles and 4 miles began to be replaced by the courses now visited by thousands annually;
2. Consider how the challenge of crossing the Devil's Dyke was overcome;
3. Contemplate why the town no longer has a steeplechase course despite having at least 5 courses during the past 2 centuries;
4. Examine the practicalities of having up to 48 starting posts and winning posts;
5. Appreciate that it was not financially viable to have an open racecourse spread widely across the heath, with a finishing post barely 200 metres from the town centre;
6. Research how and why the Cambridgeshire Handicap has been contested over 3 different courses.
NOTE: The map does not make mention of 2 particular courses:-
(i) Sefton Course (also known as the Cambridge Road Course)
Source: 1970 Raceform.  Used from 1959 to 1975.
(ii) New Circular Course
The Circular Handicap was run on Friday 29th October 1875 on the New Circular Course of about two miles.
Source: London Standard (30th October 1875): ''the horses started near the Turn of the Lands, ran back way of the Cambridgeshire Course towards the Ditch, and afterwards proceeded down the side of the Tan Gallop, and turned into the Rowley Mile near the Bretby Stakes starting post, finishing at the stand at the end of the flat. Except in the hollow near the Cambridgeshire start the runners should have been visible all the way if the sky had been bright and clear''.
Another report hoped that the Circular Handicap would become a feature in future programmes, as it would be contested in front of the new grandstand which would be completed in about a year and would be able to accommodate thousands.
(I am grateful to Tim Cox for bringing attention to these 2 courses.)
Enjoy researching the intriguing history of Newmarket and its many racecourses.
To enjoy the experience of a day at Newmarket races in May 1838 CLICK HERE

September 1887- July 1891 Tom Jennings senior, Prince Soltykoff

Tom Jennings was born on Christmas Day 1823 in Shelford, near Cambridge, progressing to be one of the top trainers in the United Kingdom. Tom did not come from a family with a background in racing, for his father was the landlord of a coaching inn in Cambridgeshire. However, that would have provided Tom with the chance to be close to horses in his formative years, and he became an apprentice jockey in Chantilly. Although his riding career was not brilliant, he became a trainer as soon as his short riding career ended, beginning in Italy before moving to France as private trainer to Count Frederic de Lagrange. He launched his illustrious UK training career in 1857 at Phantom House, Newmarket, as private trainer to Comte Frederic de Lagrange and, early in his career, he achieved his greatest success with Gladiateur (SR 2112) in 1865, winning the Triple Crown. Gladiateur, a bay colt by Monarque out of Miss Gladiator, was born at the Haras de Dangu Stud, owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, in 1862. Sent to England to be trained by Tom Jennings, he did not begin his two-year-old career until Autumn 1864, winning just one of his three races. However, he made rapid progress at 3, winning the 2000 Guineas by a neck from Archimedes, landing the Epsom Derby more comfortably by 2 lengths from Christmas Carol, before completing the Triple Crown by capturing the St Leger by 3 lengths when 8/13 favourite. After his success in the Derby, Gladiateur was sent to Paris to contest the Grand Prix du Paris, and when he won it, cheered on by an emotional French crowd, he was dubbed 'The Avenger of Waterloo'. His owner, Count Frederic de Lagrange was a French politician whose father, Joseph, was Napoleon's general. Such was the high esteem in which Tom Jennings held the Count that he named his Stables after him. In August 1887 he replaced Charles Blanton, who died on 2nd August 1887, as chief trainer to Prince Soltykoff, rewarding the Prince with early successes in 1888 when Gold won the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, and followed up by dead-heating with Hamptonia in the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket. However, the most prestigious victory for his new master came in 1890 when Gold won the Ascot Gold Cup in the hands of Fred Webb. In July 1891 Jennings resigned charge of Prince Soltykoff's horses, but despite suffering ill health, he continued to train a handful of horses at La Grange right up to his death. He died at his palatial home in Newmarket on Wednesday 12th December 1900 aged 77.
1889 Jockey Club Stakes SHEEN owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1889 Champion Stakes at Newmarket GOLD owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1890 Ascot Gold Cup GOLD owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1890 Cesarewitch SHEEN (6/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Fred Webb
1891 Lincoln Handicap LORD GEORGE (10/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings senior and ridden by Jimmy Woodburn

July 1891-December 1892 Alfred Gibbons, Prince Soltykoff
In July 1891 Prince Soltykoff decided to remove all of his racehorses from the charge of Tom Jennings senior at La Grange, erecting new stables adjoining his Kremlin House residence. Tom and the Prince parted on the best of terms, recognising that Tom wanted to be master of his own stables, while the Prince wanted to be master of his own horses. The Prince appointed Alfred Gibbons, previously head lad at Heath House Stables for 15 years with Matthew Dawson and later George Dawson, as his private trainer at Kremlin House Stables. Alfred Gibbons hit the ground running, winning the Trial Plate, at Newmarket's second July meeting on Tuesday 14th July 1891, with Lusignan (13/8 second favourite) owned by the Prince and ridden by Fred Webb. This arrangement continued until 29th December 1892 when the Prince appointed W Rogers to replace Gibbons, while Gibbons advertised in The Sportsman for a position as private trainer to any interested nobleman or gentleman. Gibbons returned in 1897 for a further two years in charge.

I am grateful to Ordnance Survey (© Crown Copyright) for permission to use the 1888-1913 map shown above.

December 1892-January 1893 W Rogers, Prince Soltykoff
When the Prince decided to sever his link with Alfred Gibbons he initially appointed W Rogers to be his private trainer at Kremlin House Stables. However, within weeks a statement was made which said, 'W Rogers has been let go for failing to come to terms with respecting the training of the select stud of racehorses belonging to Prince Soltykoff'. He was replaced by Tom Fordham on Monday 12th January 1893.

January 1893-Feb 1894 Tom Fordham, Prince Soltykoff
On Monday 12th January 1893 the Prince parted company with W Rogers and appointed as his replacement Tom Fordham. Tom had been head lad to W Robinson at Lord Gerard's training establishment. He gained an important early success on the first day of the Second Newmarket July meeting on Tuesday 11th July 1893, winning the Princes own race with Vulpecula (7/4 fav), having started that day winning the Trial Plate with Concealment (9/1). In October 1893 the Prince purchased the 259 acre Landwade Stud Farm at Kennett, near Newmarket, for £18,000 (equivalent to £2.3 million in 2020) from the estate of the late Lord Calthorpe. Tom was described as a painstaking trainer whose horses were always brought to the post in good condition. In his stint as master at Kremlin House Stables he was in charge of Woolsthorpe, guided Speed to victory in the 36th Ascot Biennial Stakes, Newmarket July Stakes and Chesterfield Stakes, and trained such stars of the day as Zamet, Lorikeet and Concealment. He was replaced by Charlie Waugh in 1894 and unfortunately suffered a prolonged period of ill health before dying on Wednesday 19th February 1902.
July 1893 Trial Plate at Newmarket CONCEALMENT (9/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Fordham and ridden by Fred Webb
July 1893 Soltykoff Stakes at Newmarket VULPECULA (7/4 fav) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Fordham and ridden by Walter Bradford

Feb 1894-1896 Charlie Waugh
In the late years of the 19th century Charlie Waugh, son of Jimmy Waugh, trained at Kremlin House Stables for Prince Soltykoff for just two seasons prior to developing Carlburg in 1900. He later moved on to Park Lodge Stables where his son was born on 22nd October 1900. During this period his father, James Waugh, continued to train at Meynell House for Lord Coventry and the Earl Cadogan, while Charles's brother Dawson trained privately for Sir John Blundell-Maple at Falmouth House.
1896 Newmarket Handicap SATI (15/8 fav) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Charlie Waugh and ridden by Herbert Toon

1897-1898 Alfred Gibbons, Prince Soltykoff
After CharlieWaugh ended his two-year stint at Kremlin, the Prince reappointed Alfred Gibbons in readiness for the 1897 season. The best horse he trained during his second period at Kremlin House Stables was Ninus who was third in the 1898 2000 Guineas behind Disraeli (SR 1967). Despite this partial success, Gibbons was replaced at the end of the season by G Platt.
1898 2000 Guineas NINUS (100/30) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Alfred Gbbons and ridden by R W Colling was third behind DISRAELI (SR 1967)

1899-August 1900 George Platt, Prince Soltykoff
In the final decade of the 19th century the Prince appointed his sixth trainer, and fifth different one, in 1899 when George Platt was employed to replace Alfred Gibbons. George, born in Stoke on Trent in 1852, was the older brother of Bill Platt, a jockey who rode the winner of the Northumberland Plate twice, firstly in 1882 aboard Victor Emmanuel, and then in 1886 aboard Stone Clink. George was a less successful rider before turning his hand to training. One of George's most prestigious successes was in the Great Eastern Railway Handicap at Newmarket when he trained the winner Leisure. He lasted for almost a two-year period, being replaced by W Hammond towards the end of the season. He died in 1930 aged 78.
1899 Great Eastern Railway Handicap at Newmarket LEISURE HOUR (100/6) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by George Platt and ridden by Lester Reiff

September 1900-1902 Hammond, Prince Soltykoff
George Platt was replaced by W Hammond, but the successes continued for the Prince, particularly at the big Newmarket Meetings. His most successful horse during his two-year stay was Volpone who won the Royal Stakes in 1901 and the Beaufort Stakes a year later. In 1903 he was replaced by, what turned out to be the Prince's final trainer, Joe Butters.
1901 Royal Stakes at Newmarket VOLPONE (2/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by W Hammond and ridden by C Jenkins
1902 Beaufort Stakes at Newmarket VOLPONE (7/1) owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by W Hammond and ridden by Sam Loates

1903-1926 Mrs Elizabeth Clinton, Joe Butters
After the death of Prince Soltykoff on 21st November 1903 the Estate passed to Mrs Elizabeth Clinton and she allowed Joe Butters, who had moved to Kremlin House just 6 weeks before the death of the Prince, to remain in place as her trainer. Joe was born at Knowsley on 20th October 1847 on the famous racing estate of Lord Derby, and began his riding career under John Scott, the legendary trainer who trained 16 St Leger and 5 Derby winners. He had his first ride in public in 1863, transferring to trainer James Waugh, and later marrying Janet Waugh, daughter of James. Joe then moved to the Continent where he rode for Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria. He achieved fame by winning all of the classics in Austria, Hungary and Germany, most famously winning the 1887 Austrian 2000 Guineas and German Derby with Zsupa owned by Baron Nathanial Rothschild. His son Fred became his assistant at Kremlin House, while his other son Frank became a successful Newmarket trainer. His daughter, Isabel Grace, married William Jarvis, son of William A Jarvis of Waterwitch House Stables, trainer to the King. Joe had a few lean years between 1903 and 1910, but in 1911 he had some talented horses in his stable, including Senseless, Kempion, Fair Relative, Cataract and Runnymede. The latter pair both won at Royal Ascot in 1911, winning the 54th Biennial Stakes and New Biennial Stakes respectively. Joe so nearly trained the winner of the 1916 Epsom Derby with Nassovian, beaten into third by a neck and a head behind Fifinella (SR 2055). Joe went on to train until retiring in 1926 at the age of 79. He continued to live in his beloved Newmarket until he died on Tuesday 19th December 1933 aged 86.

Joe Butters double at Ascot
1911 54th Ascot Biennial Stakes CATARACT 6/1 owned by Mr J Keene, trained by Joe Butters and ridden by Fred Rickaby junior
1911 New Biennial Stakes at Royal Ascot RUNNYMEDE 4/1 owned by Mr J Keene, trained by Joe Butters and ridden by Fred Rickaby junior

1926-1934 Frank Barling
Straight after the end of the First World War Francis (Frank) William Bonner Barling trained at Falmouth Lodge for Lord Glanely,1st Baron Glanely. Frank came from Ross in Herefordshire. He reached the pinnacle of his career when he trained the unexpected winner of the 1919 Epsom Derby Grand Parade (SR 1968) at 33/1 when ridden by Fred Templeman. It proved to be a spectacular year for both owner and trainer, recording 7 wins at Royal Ascot. Frank left Falmouth House the next year due to ill health, but began training again in 1925 and 1926 at La Grange, and then moved on to Kremlin House on the retirement of Joe Butters at the age of 79. During the time he operated from the various stables listed, he was also running a private stable from Primrose Cottage, passing it on to his son, Geof Bonnor Barling, in 1932. Frank died in Newmarket on 17th April 1935.

1934-1945 Honourable George Lambton
George Lambton, fifth son of George Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham, was born on 23rd December 1860 and was educated at Eton before accepting a place at Trinity College, Cambridge. His father recognised his son's passion for horse racing, claiming, 'At Eton George was rather too close to Ascot, while at Cambridge he was rather too near to Newmarket'. He became an amateur jockey, winning the 1888 Grand Steeple-Chase de Paris on Parasang, before joining the training ranks at Bedford Lodge Stables for the 16th Earl of Derby. He was tremendously successful, training no less than 13 English Classic winners, including the 1924 Derby winner Sansovino (SR 1985), and the 1933 Derby winner Hyperion (SR 2248). In 1926 Frank Butters replaced Lambton as Lord Derby's trainer, only for him to resume training for Lord Derby in 1931. However, in 1933 he was replaced by Colledge Leader, and became trainer at Kremlin House. He was much less successful at Kremlin House than he had been at Stanley House. Whether that was due to him having less talented racehorses in his charge than Lord Derby had supplied him with, or whether his age was beginning to tell, is uncertain, but he was limited to a single Royal Ascot winner during this spell, and that was Goya in the 1937 St James's Palace Stakes. He died on 23rd July 1945, passing the reins to his son Edward.
1937 St James’s Palace Stakes GOYA owned by Marcel Boussac, trained by Hon. George Lambton and ridden by Charlie Elliott

1946-1949 Teddy Lambton
On the death of his father George Lambton, Teddy Lambton took over training duties at Kremlin House. He hit the ground running in spectacular fashion, winning the 1946 Lincoln Handicap with Langton Abbot (7/1) and later in the season winning the Ebor Handicap at York with Foxtrot (3/1). He remained in charge for 3 years before Colonel Dick Warden replaced him. Teddy returned for a further stint in charge in 1953.
1946 Lincoln Handicap LANGTON ABBOT (7/1) owned by Tom Best, trained by Teddy Lambton and ridden by Tommy Weston
1946 Ebor Handicap FOXTROT (3/1) owned by Mr H E Morris, trained by Teddy Lambton and ridden by Edgar Britt

1949-1952 Colonel Dick Warden
Colonel Richard Henry Atkinson Warden, universally known as Dick Warden, was a member of the Security Section during the War. Born in London in December 1908, he was educated at Harrow and Cornell University, after which he returned to England to ride as an amateur steeplechase jockey, contesting the 1932 Grand National aboard Harewood (66/1) when unplaced behind Forbra (50/1) ridden by J Hamey. He then moved to Chantilly as assistant trainer for 3 years before the War intervened. He joined the Intelligence Corps between 1940 and January 1941, before transferring to the Security Section. After the War ended Dick took out his own trainer's licence and took charge at Kremlin House Stables in 1949. He was ably supported for two seasons by Jeremy Tree. Those two seasons encouraged Jeremy to start training on his own account in 1952 at Lansdowne House in Newmarket. When Dick moved away from Kremlin House he remained in racing and later in life struck up a relationship with Sheikh Mohammed. Dick died in 1990.

1953-1969 Teddy Lambton, Peter Robinson
When Colonel Dick Warden had completed his stint at Kremlin House Stables Teddy Lambton, son of Honourable George Lambton, returned to take command once again. In the first few years he was less successful than during his previous stint at Kremlin, but in 1968 he achieved a valuable double at Newmarket with Resolved, owned by his wife Pauline, and Kursaal, owned by his mother Mrs George Lambton. Teddy decided to retire in August 1969, encouraging Peter Robinson to apply for a trainers license. Peter trained at Kremlin House for the final 3 months of the season, doing so well that he earned a place in the jockeys and trainers tables. Teddy sold Kremlin House and Stables to Jeremy Hindley in time for the 1970 season. Peter Robinson leased Cadland House Stables from Arthur Goodwill in time for the start of the 1970 season.
1968 Long Hill Handicap at Newmarket RESOLVED (100/7) owned by Mrs Pauline Lambton, trained by Teddy Lambton and ridden by R ‘Snowy’ Fawdon
1968 Lavenham Handicap at Newmarket KURSAAL (6/1) owned by Mrs George Lambton, trained by Teddy Lambton and ridden by Peter Robinson

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1970-1976 Jeremy Hindley
Jeremy Hindley was assistant to the great Sir Noel Murless before moving to Thompson-Jones, but in the 1970/71 season he felt it was time to launch his own training career. Jeremy purchased Kremlin Stables and the nearby paddocks owned by Teddy Lambton. He extended the yard, building an extra 20 wooden loose boxes and two Dutch barns, celebrating his first winner, Hardship, in a novice hurdle at Warwick in December 1970. In his first flat season, 1971, Jeremy enjoyed 8 winners, the first being Fivepenny Piece at Yarmouth in June 1971. Successful stables need showpiece horses to advertise their stable and Jeremy got his first showpiece horse in 1972 when a two-year-old, The Go-Between, won 7 of his 10 starts, culminating in a Newmarket 5 furlong success in the Cornwallis Stakes. In the same season Jeremy was gaining prestigious wins in France, capturing the Prix de Meautry with Some Hand. In the 1973 season his stable stars were Blessed Rock and Street Light, the former winning the Seaton Deleval and Hyperion Stakes, while the latter won the St Hugh Stakes at Newbury. Further important successes in the next 4 years included a Ribblesdale Stakes winner, Northern Princess, a Queen Alexandra winner, Coed Cochion, a Cork and Orrery winner, He Loves Me, and a Cambridgeshire winner, St Timon. Jeremy eventually sold Kremlin Stables to Michael Jarvis in 1976, at which point the whole, Kremlin and 'the paddocks', was split into two with what is now Induna being bought by Nelson Guest, uncle to current trainer Rae Guest.
1972 Cornwallis Stakes THE GO-BETWEEN trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Jimmy Lindley
1972 Prix de Meautry SOME HAND trained by Jeremy Hindley
1973 Seaton Deleval BLESSED ROCK owned by Mrs E Pouret, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Lester Piggott
1973 Hyperion Stakes BLESSED ROCK 11/8 fav owned by Mrs E Pouret, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Lester Piggott
1973 St Hugh Stakes STREET LIGHT 1/2 fav trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Lester Piggott
1974 Lupe Stakes NORTHERN PRINCESS 11/4 owned by Shiegeo Yoshida, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1974 Ribblesdale Stakes NORTHERN PRINCESS owned by Shiegeo Yoshida, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1974 March Stakes at Goodwood CRASH COURSE owned by Mrs J Hindley, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1975 Doncaster Cup CRASH COURSE owned by Mrs J Hindley, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1975 Ascot Stakes CRASH COURSE owned by Mrs J Hindley, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1975 City and Suburban SWELL FELLOW 15/2 owned by Joe Albritton, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1975 Warren Stakes INVERGAYLE 25/1 owned by Joe Albritton, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1976 Queen Alexandra Stakes at Royal Ascot COED COCHION owned by Bobby McAlpine, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Paul Cook
1976 Ascot Stakes TUDOR CROWN 66/1 trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by John Lowe
1976 Lonsdale Handicap COED COCHION owned by Bobby McAlpine, trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Paul Cook
1977 Hungerford Stakes HE LOVES ME trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1977 Cork & Orrery Stakes HE LOVES ME trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Joe Mercer
1977 Greenham Stakes HE LOVES ME 14/1 trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley
1977 Cambridgeshire SIN TIMON 18/1 trained by Jeremy Hindley and ridden by Tony Kimberley

1976-February 2000 Michael Jarvis
Michael Jarvis took over the reins at Kremlin House in 1976 and within 2 years had won prestigious Handicaps like the 1978 Ebor at York with Totowah, and a year later the Northumberland Plate at Newcastle with the same horse. As well as regularly clocking up the 'bread and butter' winners each season, Michael had an excellent record in top class races. He won the Haydock Sprint Cup and Wokingham Stakes with Petong in 1984, back to back Bunbury Cups in 1990 with Fedoria and 1991 with Savoyard, and towards the end of his career he achieved consecutive Chester Cups with Anak Pekan in 2004 and 2005. Michael was one of Newmarket's most respected trainers, being described by all as a gentleman. While he was always focussed and fiercely determined, he remained polite and approachable. One of Michael's many strengths was his awareness of the opportunities which presented themselves abroad. This was particularly true about Carroll House who he sent to Baden Baden in 1988 to win the Furstenberg Rennen and, a few weeks later, the Grosser Preis Von Baden, followed the next year by success in the Phoenix Champion Stakes. But he reached the pinnacle of his career in 1989 when Carroll House triumphed in arguably the greatest race in Europe, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.

2001-February 2011 Michael Jarvis, Roger Varian
From 2001 Michael was ably supported by Roger Varian as his assistant trainer, the pair achieving 2 Classic successes in their first 4 years together. In 2001 Ameerat won the 1000 Guineas, while in 2005 Eswarah was victorious in the Epsom Oaks. Despite Michael suffering from prostate cancer, and undergoing heart surgery in 2009, the partnership with Roger continued to be strong, remaining intact until Michael's retirement through ill health in February 2011. Michael died on 20th September 2011 aged 73 and on his passing Roger Varian summed up many people's thoughts when he said, 'His achievements and racing exploits go without saying but, first and foremost, he was a wonderful man - a true gentleman and I imagine a great husband, a great father and a good friend to many. He happened to be a great racehorse trainer as well but, first and foremost, he was just a wonderful man.'
Michael Jarvis: Principal Winners
1978 Ebor Handicap TOTOWAH 20/1 owned by Lady Beaverbrook, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Paul Cook
1979 Northumberland Plate TOTOWAH 5/1 owned by Lady Beaverbrook, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1981 International Stakes BELDALE FLUTTER owned by Tony Kelly, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Pat Eddery
1982 Coronation Cup EASTER SUN owned by Lady Beaverbrook, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1984 Haydock Sprint Cup PETONG 11/1 owned by Tom Warner, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1984 Wokingham Stakes PETONG 11/1 joint favourite owned by Tom Warner, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1985 Prince of Wales's Stakes BOB BACK 33/1 owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1988 Furstenberg Rennen at Baden-Baden CARROLL HOUSE owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1988 Grosser Preis Von Baden CARROLL HOUSE owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1988 Welsh Derby at Chepstow CARROLL HOUSE owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Bruce Raymond
1988 Premio Roma WELSH GUIDE (no betting) owned by L Monaldi, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Mick Kinane
1989 Phoenix Champion Stakes CARROLL HOUSE 5/1 owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Mick Kinane
1989 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe CARROLL HOUSE (18.9/1) owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Mick Kinane
1989 Princess of Wales's Stakes CARROLL HOUSE 10/1 owned by Antonio Balzarini, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Walter Swinburn
1989 Victoria Cup TOP DREAM 14/1 owned by Raymond Anderson Green, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Walter Swinburn
1990 Bunbury Cup FEDORIA 8/1 owned by Mark Christofi, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Frankie Dettori
1991 Bunbury Cup SAVOYARD 16/1 owned by Lady Butt, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Walter Swinburn
1999 Lancashire Oaks NOUSHKEY 2/1 fav owned by Sheikh Ahmed Al Maktoum, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2000 Lancashire Oaks ELA ATHENA (5/1) owned by Andreas Michael, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2000 Prix du Jockey Club HOLDING COURT (61/10) owned by John Good, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2001 1000 Guineas AMEERAT (SR 1843) 11/1 owned by Sheikh Ahmed Al Maktoum, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2001 Grosser Preis Von Baden MORSHDI 9/2 owned by Darley Stud, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2003 Champion Stakes RAKTI 11/1 owned by Gary Tanaka, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2004 Prince of Wales's Stakes RAKTI 3/1 owned by Gary Tanaka, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2004 Queen Elizabeth II Stakes RAKTI 9/2 owned by Gary Tanaka, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2004 Chester Cup ANAK PEKAN 2/1 fav owned by HRH Sultan Ahmad Shah, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2005 Epsom Oaks ESWARAH (SR 1781) 11/4 owned by Sheikh Hamdan Al Maktoum, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Richard Hills
2005 Lockinge Stakes at Newbury RAKTI 7/4 fav owned by Gary Tanaka, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2005 Wokingham Stakes IFFRAAJ 9/4 fav owned by Sheikh Ahmed Al Maktoum, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2005 Victoria Cup IFFRAAJ 11/4 owned by Sheikh Ahmed Al Maktoum, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2005 Chester Cup ANAK PEKAN 16/1 owned by HRH Sultan Ahmad Shah, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Philip Robinson
2007 Premio Roma PRESSING 12/5 owned by Gary Tanaka, trained by Michael Jarvis and ridden by Neil Callan

2011-present Hugo Palmer (Kremlin Cottage Stable)
Hugo Palmer grew up in an environment surrounded by horses, taking part in pony club events and hunting, and working as a schoolboy at Lord Huntingdon's West Ilsley stables. Whilst completing his degree at Newcastle University he spent some time at Cheveley Park Stud, and later moved on to Highclere Stud, where he worked alongside John Warren, Racing Manager to The Queen. He then joined the stable of Patrick Chaming before taking up the post of assistant to Hughie Morrison at East Ilsley, thereafter gaining further experience in Australia at the stables of Gai Waterhouse. In 2011, aged just 29, he launched his own training career at Kremlin Cottage Stables, where he has remained for almost a decade. In that time he has notched up two classic success, firstly with Covert Love in the 2015 Irish Oaks, and a year later winning the 2016 2000 Guineas with Galileo Gold. Successes in the 2016 St James's Palace Stakes with Galileo Gold, Covert Love in the 2015 Prix L’Opera, and Making Eyes in the 2012 Jacques De Bremond at Vichy provide evidence of his versatility.
2012 Jacques De Bremond Listed Stakes at Vichy MAKING EYES 12/1 owned by Starter For Ten Partnership, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by I Mendizabal
2013 EBF Hoppings Stakes MAKING EYES 12/1 owned by Starter For Ten Partnership, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Joe Fanning
2014 Clipper Logistics Handicap SHORT SQUEEZE 8/1 owned by W Duff Gordon, R Smith and B Mathieson, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Pat Smullen
2015 Vintage Stakes GALILEO GOLD 9/2 owned by Al Shaqab Racing, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2015 Irish Oaks COVERT LOVE (SR 1911) 7/1 owned by Fomo Syndicate, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Pat Smullen
2015 Prix de L'Opera COVERT LOVE 4/1 joint fav owned by Fomo Syndicate, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Pat Smullen
2016 2000 Guineas GALILEO GOLD (SR 1958) 14/1 owned by Al Shaqab Racing, trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2016 St James's Palace Stakes GALILEO GOLD 6/1 owned by Al Shaqab Racing, Trained by Hugo Palmer and ridden by Frankie Dettori

February 2011-2017 Roger Varian
Roger Varian, loyal assistant to Michael Jarvis from 2001, took over Kremlin House in February 2011 after the retirement of his mentor Michael Jarvis and grew his string into one of the biggest and most powerful in Newmarket. He trained the 2014 St Leger winner Kingston Hill (SR 1944) and in 2016 he took over Postponed from Luca Cumani and won 4 prestigious races, the Dubai City of Gold, Dubai Sheema Classic, the Coronation Cup and the Juddmonte International Stakes. After 6 successful years at Kremlin he transferred to nearby Carlburg, the former home of 82-year-old Clive Brittain.
2013 Racing Post Trophy KINGSTON HILL (7/2 fav) owned by Paul Smith, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni
2014 St Leger KINGSTON HILL (SR 1944) 9/4 fav owned by Paul Smith, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni
2016 Dubai City of Gold at Nad Al Sheba POSTPONED (11/10 fav) owned by Mohammed Obaid Al Maktoum, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni
2016 Dubai Sheema Classic at Meydan POSTPONED (4/5 fav) owned by Mohammed Obaid Al Maktoum, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni
2016 Coronation Cup at Epsom POSTPONED (8/11 fav) owned by Mohammed Obaid Al Maktoum, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni
2016 Juddmonte International Stakes at York POSTPONED (15/8 fav) owned by Mohammed Obaid Al Maktoum, trained by Roger Varian and ridden by Andrea Atzeni

2017-May 2019 Simon Crisford
Prior to setting up as a trainer in his own right, Simon Crisford was the successful racing manager for Sheikh Mohammed. He took out a licence in 2014, launching his training career at Carlburg in 2015 where he had 40 horses in training. In that first season he trained First Selection to win the Solario Stakes in the hands of George Baker. He remained at Carlburg for 2 years before renting out Kremlin House from Gay Jarvis. He had two successful years at Kremlin House, including a 2018 Britannia Stakes success with Ostilio and a 2018 Diomed Stakes win with Century Dream. He then moved to Gainsborough Stables in June 2019.
2018 Britannia Stakes OSTILIO 10/1 owned by Sheikh Mohammed Obaid Al Maktoum, trained by Simon Crisford and ridden by Silvestre de Sousa
2018 Celebrating the Commonwealth Paradise Stakes CENTURY DREAM 5/2 owned by Abdulla Belhabb, trained by Simon Crisford and ridden by William Buick
2018 Diomed Stakes CENTURY DREAM 11/4 fav owned by Abdulla Belhabb, trained by Simon Crisford and ridden by William Buick

September 2019-2020 Tom Clover
Tom Clover has been around racehorses and a racing environment all of his life. As soon as he was allowed to do so he contested point to point races and, after completing his statutory school education, he enrolled at the Royal Agricultural College at Cirencester where he gained a diploma. Tom launched his training career at the tender age of 30 towards the end of the 2016 racing season, having spent an invaluable and educational 6 years as assistant to David Simcock at Trillium Place, on Birdcage Walk, acknowledging that David and Jennie Simcock were great role models to follow. Prior to his time with the Simcock's he worked hard to become assistant to Charlie Longsden, experiencing life in a National Hunt Stable. He took over the 25 box Wroughton House Stables, ideally located at the foot of the Warren Hill gallops, in October 2016 and was ably supported by his partner Jackie Jarvis, daughter of the Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe winning trainer, and former master of Kremlin House stables, Michael Jarvis. The pair celebrated their first winner, aptly named Declarationoflove on 8th May 2017. In November 2018 he transferred to Saville House Stables, and less than a year later, in September 2019 he, and Jackie, returned to take charge at Kremlin House Stables, leasing it from Jackie's mother Gay. It is believed that Tom moved on to the White Yard, Wroughton House Stables for the start of the 2021 season.

2021-present Martin & Michelle Smith
Martin Smith, son of former jockey and trainer Allan Smith, was destined to work in the world of racing, and he certainly made the most of the opportunities which came his way. He remembers travelling to Europe with his father, enjoying winners in Belgium, and then riding on the Flat and National Hunt around the globe. He was crowned champion amateur rider in Dubai before he retired from racing riding aged 27. His wife Michelle was also blessed with being associated with horses from an early age, competing in show-jumping events, so the couple were on familiar territory when they began training in Newmarket after Martin successfully applied for a trainer’s licence in 2011. Initially he was based at Paddocks View, Brickhill Stud in Exning in 2012, but in 2013 the couple took over at Cedar Lodge Stables on the Hamilton Road. By 2015 they had moved to Liberty Stables, further along the Hamilton Road and then transferred to Kremlin House stables for the start of the 2021 season.

Top 5 Kremlin horses of all time
CARROLL HOUSE (1989 Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe)
GOLD (1890 Ascot Gold Cup)
KINGSTON HILL (2014 St Leger)
AMEERAT (2001 1000 Guineas)
ESWARAH (2005 Epsom Oaks)
© John Slusar 2020

ISBN 978-0-9957632-0-3

652 pages

774 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-1-0

352 pages

400 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-2-7

180 pages

140 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-3-4

264 pages

235 former courses

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