La Grange Stables
If you can provide any photos associated with this stable, or additional information to fill any gaps then contact johnwslusar@gmail.com

La Grange, or Lagrange, Stables is situated on the Snailwell Road and was built in the 1870s by Tom Jennings. Tom was born on Christmas Day 1823 in Shelford, near Cambridge, progressing to be one of the top trainers in the United Kingdom. He died at his palatial home in Newmarket on Wednesday 12th December 1900 aged 77. He launched his illustrious UK training career at Phantom House, Newmarket, as private trainer to Comte Frederic de Lagrange and, early in his career, he achieved his greatest success with Gladiateur (SR 2112) in 1865, winning the Triple Crown. Gladiateur, a bay colt by Monarque out of Miss Gladiator, was born at the Haras de Dangu Stud, owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, in 1862. Sent to England to be trained by Tom Jennings, he did not begin his two-year-old career until Autumn 1864, winning just one of his three races. However, he made rapid progress at 3, winning the 2000 Guineas by a neck from Archimedes, landing the Epsom Derby more comfortably by 2 lengths from Christmas Carol, before completing the Triple Crown by capturing the St Leger by 3 lengths when 8/13 favourite. After his success in the Derby, Gladiateur was sent to Paris to contest the Grand Prix du Paris, and when he won it, cheered on by an emotional French crowd, he was dubbed ‘The Avenger of Waterloo’. His owner, Count Frederic de Lagrange was a French politician whose father, Joseph, was Napoleon's general. Such was the high esteem in which Tom Jennings held the Count that he named his Stables after him.

NEWMARKET RACECOURSES
For over 4 centuries racing has been staged in Newmarket, but how have the racecourses evolved from an initial starting point at Fleam Dyke Pumping Station, some 8 miles from the town, with a winning post barely 200 metres from the town centre, into two world recognized, excellent racecourses and a universal acceptance that Newmarket is the Headquarters of racing?
To access an interactive racecourse map showing over 50 individually named racecourses CLICK HERE. The map will enable you to:-
1. Determine when extended races over 8 miles, 6 miles and 4 miles began to be replaced by the courses now visited by thousands annually;
2. Consider how the challenge of crossing the Devil's Dyke was overcome;
3. Contemplate why the town no longer has a steeplechase course despite having at least 5 courses during the past 2 centuries;
4. Examine the practicalities of having up to 48 starting posts and winning posts;
5. Appreciate that it was not financially viable to have an open racecourse spread widely across the heath, with a finishing post barely 200 metres from the town centre;
6. Research how and why the Cambridgeshire Handicap has been contested over 3 different courses.
NOTE: The map does not make mention of 2 particular courses:-
(i) Sefton Course (also known as the Cambridge Road Course)
Source: 1970 Raceform.  Used from 1959 to 1975.
(ii) New Circular Course
The Circular Handicap was run on Friday 29th October 1875 on the New Circular Course of about two miles.
Source: London Standard (30th October 1875): ''the horses started near the Turn of the Lands, ran back way of the Cambridgeshire Course towards the Ditch, and afterwards proceeded down the side of the Tan Gallop, and turned into the Rowley Mile near the Bretby Stakes starting post, finishing at the stand at the end of the flat. Except in the hollow near the Cambridgeshire start the runners should have been visible all the way if the sky had been bright and clear''.
Another report hoped that the Circular Handicap would become a feature in future programmes, as it would be contested in front of the new grandstand which would be completed in about a year and would be able to accommodate thousands.
(I am grateful to Tim Cox for bringing attention to these 2 courses.)
Enjoy researching the intriguing history of Newmarket and its many racecourses.
To enjoy the experience of a day at Newmarket races in May 1838 CLICK HERE

1873-1900 Tom Jennings, Count Frederic de Lagrange, Prince Soltykoff
Tom Jennings did not come from a family with a background in racing, for his father was the landlord of a coaching inn in Cambridgeshire. However, that would have provided Tom with the chance to be close to horses in his formative years, and he became an apprentice jockey in Chantilly. Although his riding career was not brilliant, he became a trainer as soon as his short riding career ended, beginning in Italy before moving to France as private trainer to Count Frederic de Lagrange. In 1857 he moved to Phantom House, Newmarket, bringing the best of the Count's horses with him. He gained his first Classic winner in 1864 when Fille de L'Air (SR 1950) won the Epsom Oaks as 6/4 favourite, before gaining his great Triple Crown success with Gladiateur (SR 2112) in 1865. Gladiateur showed his well-being in 1866 when winning the Ascot Gold Cup. Tom is reported to have won £30,000 from Gladiateur's Triple Crown victory and was able to start the process of building his own stables, which he later named La Grange. They were completed in the early 1870s and he was able to move from Phantom House. On 22nd November 1883 Count Frederic de Lagrange died, but Tom was later able to call on another benefactor, Prince Soltykoff. Tom had his own views on how horses should be trained, preferring not to clad his horses with boots and bandages, believing nature would ensure his horses did not break down if they were fit, well-fed and well cared for. In 1887 he replaced Charles Blanton, who died on 2nd August 1887, as chief trainer to Prince Soltykoff, rewarding the Prince with early successes in 1888 when Gold won the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, and followed up by dead-heating with Hamptonia in the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket. However, the most prestigious victory for his new master came in 1890 when Gold won the Ascot Gold Cup in the hands of Fred Webb. In July 1891 Jennings resigned charge of Prince Soltykoff's horses, but despite suffering ill health, he continued to train a handful of horses right up to his death on 12th December 1900.
1864 Lincoln Handicap BENJAMIN 100/30 Owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Hunter
1864 Epsom Oaks FILLE DE L'AIR 6/4 fav (SR 1950) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Arthur Edwards
1865 2000 Guineas GLADIATEUR 7/1 (SR 2112) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Harry Grimshaw
1865 Epsom Derby GLADIATEUR 5/2 fav (SR 2112) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Harry Grimshaw
1865 St Leger GLADIATEUR 8/13 fav (SR 2112) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Harry Grimshaw
1866 Ascot Gold Cup GLADIATEUR owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Harry Grimshaw
1871 Ascot Gold Cup MORTEMER owned by Claude Joachim Lefevre, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by George Fordham
1872 1000 Guineas REINE 100/6 (SR 1919) owned by Claude Joachim Lefevre, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Henry Parry
1872 Epsom Oaks REINE 5/2 fav (SR 1919) owned by Claude Joachim Lefevre, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by George Fordham
1877 2000 Guineas CHAMANT 2/1 jt fav (SR 1933) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Jem Goater
1878 Ascot Gold Cup VERNEUIL owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Jem Goater

1879 St Leger RAYON D'OR 3/1 jt fav (SR 1971) owned by Count Frederic de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Jem Goater
1882 Lincoln Handicap POULET 20/1 owned by Count Frederick de Lagrange, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Jem Goater
1890 Ascot Gold Cup GOLD owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Fred Webb
1890 Cesarewitch SHEEN 100/30 owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by Fred Webb
1891 Lincoln Handicap LORD GEORGE 10/1 owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by J Woodburn
1893 Cesarewitch CYPRIA 66/1, owned by Prince Soltykoff, trained by Tom Jennings and ridden by W Pratt dead-heated with Red Eyes

I am grateful to Ordnance Survey (© Crown Copyright) for permission to use the 1836 map shown above. La Grange is 5

1903-1920 George Harvey Blackwell
When Tom Jennings died La Grange was taken over by George Blackwell who had served his training apprenticeship with Matt Dawson at Heath House before branching out on his own in 1892, landing the Doncaster Cup in 1898 with Pinfold for Sir James Miller. George enjoyed early success in his training career, sending out Rock Sand (SR 2051) to land the Triple Crown in 1903 when he was still based at Beverley House. In July 1906 the Sporting Life listed all of the Newmarket Stables together with their respective trainers; George Blackwell was listed at Lagrange. In 1920 George sold La Grange to Lord Glanely and moved to Sunnyside (Nunnery Stables) where he completed a unique double, having trained the Epsom Derby winner in 1903, he completed an unusual double training the 1923 Grand National winner Sergeant Murphy. He trained at Sunnyside, in Park Lane, Newmarket, where he resided until his death on 16th September 1942 aged 81.

1901 1000 Guineas AIDA (SR 1878) 13/8 fav owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Otto Madden
1902 Woodcote Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1902 Coventry Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher


1902 Champagne Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1902 Dewhurst Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 2000 Guineas ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by J H Martin
1903 Epsom Derby ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 St James's Palace Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1903 St Leger ROCK SAND (SR 2051) owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1904 Hardwicke Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1904 Prince of Wales's Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher
1904 Jockey Club Stakes ROCK SAND owned by Sir James Miller, trained by George Blackwell and ridden by Danny Maher

ROCK SAND (SR 2051)
Rock Sand, by Sainfoin out of Roquebrune, was a small brown colt bred by Sir James Miller at his Hamilton Stud in Newmarket. Sir James is the great, great, great uncle of Newmarket trainer Hugo Palmer who, in 2019, trains at Kremlin Cottage, neighbouring stable to La Grange. Although Rock Sand didn't sparkle on the gallops, he proved his well-being at two by landing the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, the Coventry Stakes at Royal Ascot, the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster and the Dewhurst Stakes at Newmarket. He landed the 2000 Guineas by 1 1/2 lengths as 6/4 favourite in 1903 in the hands of J H Martin, beating Flotsam. He was a strong fancy for the Epsom Derby, being made 4/6 favourite, and duly obliged by 2 lengths from Vinicius when piloted by Danny Maher. Maher was aboard when Rock Sand completed the Triple Crown by 4 lengths, going off at 2/5 favourite. As a four-year-old he won the Hardwicke Stakes at Royal Ascot, the Prince of Wales's Stakes, before winning the Jockey Club Stakes at Newmarket, cheered on enthusiastically by his home crowd. In a career encompassing 20 races, Rock Sand won 16 times and was never out of the first three. He was then retired to stud, although Sir James Miller died in 1906 and Rock Sand was sold to August Belmont for £25,000 (equivalent in 2019 to £3 million) and moved to USA.

1920-1939 Lord Glanely
In 1919 discussions took place concerning the sale of La Grange, while in 1920 George Blackwell completed the sale to Lord Glanely and, shortly afterwards, he decided to adjust the name to The Grange. Lord Glanely, who made his fortune from shipping, employed a number of trainers during his ownership of La Grange, including W J Platt, Charles Marsh, Fred C Archer, Frank Barling and Captain Thomas Hogg, who provided him with a number of Classic victories. When the Second World War broke out in 1939 La Grange was requisitioned by the British Army and Lord Glanely moved his horses to Manton.
1920 Duke of Cambridge Handicap (Newmarket) STARSHOT (4/1) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by James W Platt and ridden by A Whalley
1923 Easter Stakes (Kempton) HELIASTER (9/2) owned by Sir W Cooke, trained by James W Platt and ridden by E Gardner
1930 Epsom Oaks ROSE OF ENGLAND 7/1 (SR 1808) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards

1930 St Leger SINGAPORE 4/1 jt fav (SR 1924) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards
1934 2000 Guineas COLOMBO 2/7 fav (SR 2031) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Rae Johnstone
1937 St Leger CHULMLEIGH 18/1 (SR 1913) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards

1920-1924 J W Platt & Lord Glanely
When Lord Glanely completed the purchase of La Grange in 1920 he appointed James Platt as his private trainer. James W Platt, born in Yorkshire in 1883, was the son of a jockey also named James. James (junior) became an apprentice jockey before beginning a training career as private trainer to James Bell in Berkshire. In 1909 he moved to Priam Lodge Stables in Epsom, where he remained until 1911. He then moved on to train in Winchester before the outbreak of the First World War. After the War ended James W Platt landed the plum job of private trainer to Lord Glanely at La Grange, then newly named as The Grange. Although he notched up a good number of minor victories, his most celebrated success came in the Duke of Cambridge Handicap at Headquarters with Starshot. He remained at The Grange until the end of the 1924, and unfortunately died in 1928 aged just 45.
1920 Heath Handicap (Newmarket) WILLBLEND (10/1) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by James W Platt and ridden by A Whalley
1920 Duke of Cambridge Handicap (Newmarket) STARSHOT (4/1) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by James W Platt and ridden by A Whalley
1923 Easter Stakes (Kempton) HELIASTER (9/2) owned by Sir W Cooke, trained by James W Platt and ridden by E Gardner

1925-March 1926 Frank Barling
Straight after the end of the First World War Francis (Frank) William Bonner Barling, who originated from Ross in Herefordshire, trained at Falmouth Lodge for Lord Glanely,1st Baron Glanely. He reached the pinnacle of his career when he trained the unexpected winner of the 1919 Epsom Derby Grand Parade (SR 1968) at 33/1 when ridden by Fred Templeman. It proved to be a spectacular year for both owner and trainer, recording 7 wins at Royal Ascot, all of which are listed below. Frank left Falmouth House the next year due to ill health, but began training again in 1925 and 1926 at La Grange, and by 1931 had moved on to Kremlin House. During the time he operated from the various stables listed, he was also running a private stable from Primrose Cottage, passing it on to his son, Geof Bonnor Barling, in 1932. Frank died in Newmarket on 17th April 1935.

newmarket 1918e.JPG (26765 bytes) Newmarket 1940.JPG (18535 bytes) newmarket 1948e.JPG (10601 bytes)

April 1926-December 1927 Fred C Archer & Lord Glanely
After Frank Barling left The Grange in March 1926 he was replaced by Fred C Archer, with Charles Marsh appointed as his assistant. This agreement continued for a little over a year, but in December 1927 newspapers reported that there was much discussion taking place about who should replace Fred C Archer at The Grange, and whether a small, inexperienced trainer should be given an opportunity to prove himself. His racing manager at the time, Captain Lewis, reported that Tom Waugh and Hugh Powney were in the frame. However, in January 1928 it was confirmed that Charles Marsh would take over full command.

January 1928-September 1928 Charles Marsh & Lord Glanely
In January 1928 Charles Marsh, previously assistant trainer to Fred C Archer, took over at The Grange, although Lord Glanely agreed to send 9 horses to Fred C Archer as he began a new career as a public trainer. At the same time Captain Thomas Hogg was appointed as Racing Manager at The Grange, although he was not expected to relinquish his position at Russley Park, Wiltshire. Furthermore, Gordon Richards was appointed stable jockey at The Grange. In September, just 8 months after his appointment, Charles Marsh was forced to retire through ill health.

October 1928- 1939 Lord Glanely and Captain Thomas Hogg
When Charles Marsh retired in September 1928 he was replaced by the experienced trainer Captain Thomas Hogg, who had been the Racing Manager during Marsh's time in charge. As private trainer to Lord Glanely, Thomas enjoyed the most successful period of his career. He won the 1930 Epsom Oaks with Rose of England (SR 1808) ridden by Gordon Richards, and in the same year he won the St Leger with Singapore (SR 1924) also ridden by Gordon Richards. In 1934 he won the 2000 Guineas with Colombo 2/7 fav (SR 2031) when ridden by Rae Johnstone, while in 1937 he captured his second St Leger with Chulmleigh (SR 1913) ridden by Gordon Richards. He moved to Heath House Stables in 1940, but his time there was short as he died in 1942.
1930 Epsom Oaks ROSE OF ENGLAND 7/1 (SR 1808) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards
1930 St Leger SINGAPORE 4/1 jt fav (SR 1924) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards
1934 2000 Guineas COLOMBO 2/7 fav (SR 2031) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Rae Johnstone
1937 St Leger CHULMLEIGH 18/1 (SR 1913) owned by Lord Glanely, trained by Thomas Hogg and ridden by Gordon Richards

1939-1944 British Army
At the outbreak of the Second World War La Grange was requisitioned by the British Army.

August 1944 Lord Fitzwilliam
In August 1944 newspapers widely reported that La Grange, also known as The Grange, was purchased by Lord Fitzwilliam.

1950-May 1952 Geoffrey Brooke, Major Lionel Holliday
After the Second World War had ended La Grange was purchased by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, a wealthy Yorkshireman who made his money from manufacturing dyes. He was born in Huddersfield on 12th January 1880 and lived near Pontefract at Badsworth Hall. He was educated at Oatlands School in Harrogate, followed by Uppingham School and Bonn University. He rented, and eventually purchased, Copgrove Hall in 1936. He enjoyed racing and could afford to indulge his hobby by owning racehorses, but in 1946 he took his interest to a whole new level when he bought La Grange stables. He was a moody, awkward character to deal with, which led to him employing and discarding a number of trainers. He first appointed Geoffrey Brooke in 1950, remaining loyal to Brooke until 1952. During this period Holliday won the 1946 Princess Elizabeth Stakes with Netherton Maid, when trained by R W Colling, and the 1951 Epsom Oaks with Neasham Belle when trained by Geoffrey Brooke. However, in 1952 things came to a head when Holliday enquired about the performance of a runner he had at Ripon. He is said to have phoned Brooke and said, ‘What happened to my filly at Ripon? One of my friends said she did not run very well and did not look too well either’. Brooke's response was, ’I did not know you had any friends’, which marked a point of no return in the relationship, and shortly afterwards Brooke was replaced by Humphrey Cottrill. In 1958 Holliday expanded his interest in racing by purchasing Sandwich Stud on the Moulton Road on the outskirts of Newmarket.
1951 Epsom Oaks NEASHAM BELLE (SR 1904) 33/1 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Geoffrey Brooke and ridden by Stan Clayton

June 1952-1957 Major Lionel Holliday, Humphrey Cottrill
Humphrey Lawson Cottrill, born on 10th September 1906 at Ashton upon Mersey, near Manchester, was the eldest son of racehorse trainer Harry Cottrill. Cotterill senior trained the 1927 2000 Guineas winner Apple Sammy (SR 1983) and the 1936 Epsom Oaks winner Lovely Rosa (SR 1731), as well as the Royal Hunt Cup and Portland Handicap winner Irish Elegance. Humphrey acted as assistant to his father from 1928, at Seven Barrow, Lambourn, until the outbreak of the War, where he carried out active service in India and Burma. In 1950 Humphrey worked as assistant trainer to Willie Pratt at Stanley House, before landing the plum job of private trainer to Major Lionel Holliday in 1952. Almost immediately Humphrey rewarded his master when Noble Chieftain won the 1954 Coventry Stakes, and Bride Elect was victorious in the Queen Mary, both in the hands of Frank Barlow. Further successes followed that year when Chatsworth landed the Manchester Cup, as 5/2 favourite, and the Great Jubilee Handicap at Kempton at 9/2. Other principal race successes came in 1955 when Dacian landed the Dewhurst Stakes and, a year later, the Gordon Stakes, while Pharsalia won the Molecomb and Lowther Stakes in 1956. Arguably his two best wins were in 1954 when Narrator unexpectedly won the Champion Stakes at 20/1, and Gratitude won the 1957 Nunthorpe Stakes at 7/2. However, despite all of these successes, Humphrey anticipated that the irascible Holliday would, at some stage, sack him, and when it happened at the end of the 1957 season Humphrey had already purchased Beverley House, transferring at the end of 1957 ready for the start of the 1958 Flat season.
1954 Great Jubilee Handicap CHATSWORTH (9/2) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1954 Coventry Stakes NOBLE CHIEFTAIN (11/8 fav) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1954 Queen Mary Stakes BRIDE ELECT (6/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1954 Manchester Cup CHATSWORTH (5/2 fav) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1954 Champion Stakes NARRATOR (20/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1955 Manchester Cup CHATSWORTH (7/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Frank Barlow
1955 Dewhurst Stakes DACIAN (7/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1956 Craven Stakes PIRATE KING (100/8) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1956 Fred Darling Stakes NONE FAIRER (100/7) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1956 St James's Palace Stakes PIRATE KING (6/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Doug Smith
1956 Queen Mary Stakes PHARSALIA (100/7) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Lester Piggott
1956 Gordon Stakes DACIAN (10/1) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1956 Molecomb Stakes PHARSALIA (11/8 fav) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1956 Lowther Stakes PHARSALIA (7/4 fav) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith
1957 Nunthorpe Stakes GRATITUDE (7/2) owned by Major Lionel Brook Holliday, trained by Humphrey Cottrill and ridden by Willie Snaith

1957-1962 Dick Hern, Major Lionel Holliday
William Richard Hern, universally known as Dick, was born at Holford, Somerset on 20th January 1921. He had a distinguished career in the Army, reaching the rank of Major, before becoming a riding instructor, which included guiding the British Olympic team to gold medal success in 1952. He was appointed to train 50 horses privately for Major Lionel Brook Holliday at La Grange Stables at the end of the 1957 season, replacing Humphrey Cottrill who Holliday had dismissed. Hern enjoyed early successes with the filly None Nicer, winning the Yorkshire Oaks and Ribblesdale Stakes in 1958, followed by a July Cup victory with Gallivanter in 1961. However, the highlight of his time at La Grange was winning the 1962 St Leger with Hethersett (SR 2050) ridden by Harry Carr. At the end of the 1962 season his time at La Grange ended, and he moved to West Ilsley to take over from Jack Colling. There he enjoyed a remarkable career, winning 16 Classics and being crowned Champion Trainer on four occasions, 1962, 1972, 1980 and 1983. His achievements were all the more remarkable because he was confined to a wheelchair in December 1984 after a hunting accident. He died in Oxford on 22nd May 2002 aged 81.
1958 Yorkshire Oaks NONE NICER 4/1 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Stan Clayton
1958 Ribblesdale Stakes NONE NICER 11/2 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Stan Clayton
1961 July Cup GALLIVANTER 9/2 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Harry Carr
1962 Nassau Stakes NORTIA 100/30 jt fav owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Joe Mercer
1962 Great Voltigeur Stakes HETHERSETT 15/2 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Frankie Durr
1962 St Leger HETHERSETT (SR 2050) 100/8 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Dick Hern and ridden by Harry Carr

1965-1978 Lagrange Selling Handicap over 1 1/4 miles
In the mid-1960s six of the most prestigious, historical racing stables in Newmarket were honoured by having races named after them on the July course on the Saturday of the late August meeting. One of the six selected was Lagrange Stables, which continued into the 1980s despite the Philip Cornes sponsored events replacing some of the other Stable's races, with results shown below:-
1965 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by LUCKY HOOK (9/4) ridden by David Greening
1966 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by CROFT WHATS WANTED (9/4) trained by Fred Armstrong and ridden by Lester Piggott
1967 Lagrange Selling Handicap did not take place
1968 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by JANUARY (4/1) trained by Sturdy and ridden by Graham Sexton
1969 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by SOCKET (10/1) trained by T Corbett and ridden by Sandy Barclay
1970 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by DERRINGER (8/1) trained by Peter Makin and ridden by T Reidy
1971 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by TAVEN (9/4 fav) trained by Jimmy Etherington and ridden by Willie Carson
1972 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by SAND VALLEY (7/2 fav) trained by Mrs Rosemary Lomax and ridden by Frankie Durr
1973 Lagrange Selling Handicap was won by FEA AR (4/6 fav) trained by Geoff Balding and ridden by John Matthias
1974 Lagrange Selling Stakes was won by PINCHARIO (8/1) trained by Hugh Collingridge and ridden by Graham Sexton
1975 Lagrange Selling Stakes was won by JETADOR (7/1) trained by Bill Wightman and ridden by Eric Eldin
1976 Lagrange Selling Stakes was won by TAJ GIRL (5/2) trained by W Stephenson and ridden by Dennis Ryan
1977 Lagrange Selling Stakes was won by PARATUS (5/2 fav) trained by R Carter and ridden by Edward Hide
1978 Lagrange Selling Stakes was won by ONE-CAL (9/2) trained by Patrick Haslam and ridden by Brian Jago

1962-1967 Major Lionel Holliday, Walter Wharton
When Major Dick Hern departed for West Ilsley at the end of the 1962 season he was replaced by Walter Wharton. Walter took out a trainers licence in 1950 and began his training career at Wetherby Park before moving on to Newmarket, Richmond and Melton Mowbray. Walter rewarded his new master with Classic success in 1965 when Night Off (SR 1764) won the 1000 Guineas at 9/2 in the hands of Bill Williamson. Major Holliday also had a stud, Sandwich Stud, on the outskirts of Newmarket, where Vaguely Noble was born in 1965. However, Holliday died on 17th December 1965, so he never witnessed the great achievements of his foal. Walter Wharton trained Vaguely Noble for the Major's son, also named Lionel Brook Holliday, for his two-year-old career, winning the 1967 Observer Gold Cup by an impressive 7 lengths, but at the end of the season the colt had to be sold to pay for death duties. He was sold to Nelson Bunker-Hunt for 136,000 guineas and sent to Ireland to be trained by Paddy Prendergast, before moving to Etienne Pollet in France. He went on to win the 1968 Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe. When Mr L B Holliday had to sell off his father's assets to pay for death duties, Walter moved to Richmond at the end of the 1967 season to continue his training career.
1964 Ebor Handicap PROPER PRIDE 28/1 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Walter Wharton and ridden by Doug Smith
1965 1000 Guineas NIGHT OFF (SR 1764) 9/2 owned by Major Holliday, trained by Walter Wharton and ridden by Bill Williamson
1967 Observer Gold Cup VAGUELY NOBLE 8/1 owned by Mr L B Holliday, trained by Walter Wharton and ridden by Bill Williamson

1968- June 1976 Thomas 'Atty' Corbett, Mr Lionel Brook Holliday junior
The Honourable Thomas Anthony Corbett, universally known as Atty, was born on 10th October 1921, son of the 2nd Baron Rowallan, Thomas Godfrey Corbett. He had a distinguished career in the Grenadier Guards, attaining the rank of Captain, and once the War had ended he began to train racehorses. Initially he trained at Compton, Berkshire, but in January 1968 he transferred to La Grange. In June 1972 he broke his left leg when thrown from a horse on Newmarket Heath, while on 27th November 1976 he tragically died, aged 55. when hit by a car at a road junction in Newmarket while leading up some horses.

1976-1985 Ron Boss
After the tragic death of Atty Corbett in November 1976 La Grange was taken over by Ron Boss. Ron was born in Barry, in the Vale of Glamorgan, and after spending 10 years as assistant trainer in Lewes he moved to Newmarket in 1972. In 1976, when he arrived at La Grange, he enjoyed immediate success. In 1977 he saddled Olwyn to win the Irish Oaks by a short head from Sassabunda, whilst still a maiden, when ridden by Kipper Lynch. In 1979 Alan Bond was appointed stable jockey on the back of winning the apprentice championship in both 1974 with 40 winners and 1975 with 66 winners. Ron retired as a trainer in 1997 after spending 25 years in Newmarket.

1976 Queen Mary Stakes CRAMOND 20/1 owned by Mrs S Eldin, trained by Ron Boss and ridden by Joe Mercer

1977 Norfolk Stakes EMBOSS 11/4 owned by T Saud, trained by Ron Boss and ridden by Lester Piggott

1977 Irish Oaks OLWYN (SR 1723) 11/2 owned by Souren Vanian, trained by Ron Boss and ridden by Kipper Lynch

1978 Lincoln Handicap CAPTAIN'S WINGS 13/2 fav trained by Ron Boss and ridden by Michael Wigham

1985-December 1990 Geoff Huffer
At the end of Ron Boss's period at La Grange the stables were taken over by Geoff Huffer. At the start of the 1979 season Huffer began training at Cheveley Park Stables, having been assistant to John Bingham in Doncaster. In 1982 he moved stables twice in one season, transferring from Cheveley Park Stables to the Lester Piggott owned Calder Park Stables in January, before moving to Somerville Lodge in October 1982. At La Grange he trained predominantly for Kuwait based owners and enjoyed a Group race success in 1988 when Persian Heights won the St James's Palace Stakes at Royal Ascot. In December 1990 newspapers reported that receivers had been appointed at La Grange, owned by Kuwait-backed Gulf Racing and Bloodstock. Communication with the directors had proved difficult after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.
1988 St James's Palace Stakes PERSIAN HEIGHTS owned by Yazid Said, trained by Geoff Huffer and ridden by Pat Eddery

December 1990-mid-1992 Yard left empty
There was a period of about 3 years, staring in 1990, when the yard was empty and began to deteriorate. That period ended in the middle of 1992 when Sean Woods bought La Grange and began training there.

1992- 2002 Sean Woods owner/trainer
Sean Woods was born in Bangalore on 2nd July 1965 into a racing dynasty that had its roots in India. Indeed, Sean is fluent in Hindi and Tamil, and began his career as a jump jockey, although he accepted early on that he would not reach the top as a jockey, riding just over 80 winners. He became assistant to Tony Hide before embarking on his own training career. He purchased La Grange in mid-1992, when it was run down and in need of a far-reaching restoration programme. He was aged just 26, but had soon installed a new horsewalker, weighbridge and solarium, and built an indoor ride. He was able to call on the support of his family at Woodsway Stud, Tuddenham, just 10 miles from Newmarket, and also appointed brother Wendyll as his stable jockey. After a successful training period he departed for Hong Kong in 2002, where he has continued his training career ever since.

Prior to 2008 James Fanshawe
Between Sean Woods departure in 2002 and Ed Dunlop's arrival in late 2008 James Fanshawe rented La Grange for a period.

Late 2008-present Ed Dunlop
Ed Dunlop was born into the world of racing as the son of Classic winning trainer John Leeper Dunlop OBE, and was privileged to have grown up at Castle Stables on the Duke of Norfolk's estate in Arundel. He was educated at Eton before working in Ireland, Kentucky and Sydney at various studs. His father trained horses for the flat, so it is perhaps surprising that Ed became assistant to the renowned champion National Hunt trainer Nicky Henderson. Ed then moved back to a flat racing environment, and to racing's Headquarters, working as assistant to the much-respected Alex Scott. However, in 1994 all changed when Alex was tragically killed in a dispute with one of his grooms, but Sheikh Maktoum Al Maktoum had sufficient confidence in Ed's ability to invite him to take charge at his Gainsborough Stables on the Hamilton Road. Ed's first winner was Lynton Lad at Yarmouth on 19th October 1994, but since then he has notched up many Classic and Group race victories. The death of Sheikh Maktoum Al Maktoum on 4th January 2006 created uncertainty, and Ed realised his time at Gainsborough Stables was limited, so towards the end of the 2008 season he moved across town to take charge at the historic La Grange stables. Although his achievements at Gainsborough were the envy of many, he surpassed these at his new location. However, the highlight of his training career to date was his association with Lord Derby's filly Ouija Board (SR 1942) who, as a two-year-old, won a lowly novice race at Yarmouth, but under Ed's guidance she became a dual Classic winner and captured the 2004 Breeders' Cup Filly and Mare Turf at Lone Star Park in Texas. Further successes, listed below, followed the next year, and it is fair to state that her successes launched Ed onto the world stage, laying his foundations for further international victories by Classic winner Snow Fairy (SR 1849) in Japan's 2010 Queen Elizabeth II Commemorative Cup and Red Cadeaux's success in Hong Kong and near successes in three Melbourne Cups. Despite being at the top of his game for a quarter of a century, you sense Ed Dunlop's story has not yet been completed.
1996 Beeswing Stakes IKTAMAL 3/1 jt fav owned by Hamdan Al Maktoum, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Willie Ryan
1996 Haydock Sprint Cup IKTAMAL 10/1 owned by Hamdan Al Maktoum, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Willie Ryan
1996 Poule d'Essai des Pouliches TA RIB 141/10 owned by Hamdan Al Maktoum, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Willie Carson
2001 Nassau Stakes LAILANI 5/4 fav Owned by Maktoum Al Maktoum, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2004 Epsom Oaks OUIJA BOARD (SR 1942) 7/2 owned by 19th Earl of Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Kieren Fallon
2004 Irish Oaks OUIJA BOARD (SR 1942) 4/7 fav owned by 19th Earl of Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Kieren Fallon
2004 Breeders' Cup Filly and Mare Turf OUIJA BOARD 10/11 fav owned by Lord Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Kieren Fallon
2005 Hong Kong Vase OUIJA BOARD 5/2 owned by Lord Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Kieren Fallon
2006 Prince of Wales's Stakes OUIJA BOARD 8/1 owned by Lord Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Olivier Peslier
2006 Nassau Stakes OUIJA BOARD evens fav owned by Lord Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2006 Breeders' Cup Filly and Mare Turf OUIJA BOARD 6/4 fav owned by Lord Derby, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2010 Epsom Oaks SNOW FAIRY (SR 1849) 9/1 owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Ryan Moore
2010 Irish Oaks SNOW FAIRY (SR 1849) 7/2 owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Ryan Moore
2010 Queen Elizabeth II Commemorative Cup (Japan) SNOW FAIRY 15/2 owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Ryan Moore
2010 Hong Kong Cup SNOW FAIRY 6/4 fav owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Ryan Moore
2011 Queen Elizabeth II Commemorative Cup (Japan) SNOW FAIRY 17/10 fav owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Ryan Moore
2011 Curragh Cup RED CADEAUX 7/2 owned by Ron J Arculli, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Tom McLaughlin
2012 Yorkshire Cup RED CADEAUX 4/1 owned by Ron J Arculli, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Tom McLaughlin
2012 Irish Champion Stakes SNOW FAIRY 15/8 owned by Anamoine Ltd, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Frankie Dettori
2012 Hong Kong Vase RED CADEAUX 10/1 owned by Ron J Arculli, trained by Ed Dunlop and ridden by Gerald Mosse

Top 5 La Grange horses of all time
ROCK SAND (1903 English Triple Crown)
HETHERSETT (1962 St Leger)
COLOMBO (1934 2000 Guineas)
OUIJA BOARD (2004 Epsom & Irish Oaks)
RAYON D'OR (1879 St Leger)
© John Slusar 2020

ISBN 978-0-9957632-0-3

652 pages

774 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-1-0

352 pages

400 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-2-7

180 pages

140 former courses

ISBN 978-0-9957632-3-4

264 pages

235 former courses

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